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SEO in 2019, updated tip & tricks.

Google has updated it's SEO rules and scoring mechanics and sites will also be subjected to manual review by actual people. This means that the "old" SEO game of tricking the system will be harder or even useless. That said if you practiced good SEO before not much will change for you since you never tried to trick the system, to begin with. A 200-page manual was released/leaked with instructions from Google to the reviewers on how to proceed/rate websites from now on. With the vast amount of websites out there, it will take some time before you will be reviewed but manual reviews are here to stay and will most certainly weed out the bad SEO practices of the past. This will be a short and sweet article going over the basics and some end-user examples from me the author.

What is SEO?

SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization it basically is about how a human will try to make a site in terms of the actual coding so that a machine/algorithms/AI can understand so it may be ranked and listed in a search engine. Various factors will set your ranking XYZ, trying to cheat the system will be penalized as well as being harmful to web users, helpful content, as well as content from reputable people, will be ranked higher.

Content is King.

Google and any other search engine for that matter provide one service and one service only that is to provide a list of results from a web user query. so it is in a search engine best interest to answer any query the best possible way. To do so search engines as Google will use programs/algorithms to visit a site and see how it may be listed on their site. For the 2019 update, Google now tries to determine the user reputation as a writer on the content he/she provides. You do not per se have to hold for instance a Ph.D. in a field but it would help if you do and Google can find that on the web. What also counts is experience Google tries to determine that by finding out more articles of a subject matter you have written about or that you collaborated on with others. It is not just written content it can also be images and videos or even podcasts. Another factor will be back-links to your site or a specific article as well as the authority of those links, the big change this time around is the authority of the link(s) so it is wise to ensure if you want to work on backlinks that those come from good sites in an organic way, so no paid linking as well as advertisement. In short, go for quality over quantity when you try to generate/create backlinks. The next change is the user experience, how easy is to access the information and how do you provide useful content to the web. A fast responsive website that is not cluttered with advertisement and has a proper markup in terms of coding as well as the markup of the text so the end user can read without distractions and does not leave your site and goes elsewhere. A higher bounce rate is a good indication that a user found what he/she is looking for. And finally in somewhat ties into backlinks what do other random web users think of your site and the content it provides. Reviews or links as a source are a great way to determine that factor.

Content Delivery Network.

A CDN or content delivery network is a great way to gain access to more people all over the world by having your website caches in a cloud-like network. This means that the main server you work on and hosts your site is located near you, your content will be served to web users by a local server decreasing load times and increasing responsiveness. Google as others also considers load times and optimization a factor when ranking your site so even though you have basic hosting a CDN will help with those factors by speeding up that process since they always use high-end servers and internet connections.

SSL and HTTPS.

Another important change is the enforcement of the https protocol for all websites, not just websites that have online transactions. So your entire website has to be using the https://your content, to increase its ranking. This will prevent the spreading of malware and make the web a safer place. This also ties into the end user experience. You can either get an SSL certificate to start using the https:// protocol from your hosting provider or from your CDN network.

What does it mean in practice?

Let's take my website hisevilness.com and this article as an example, it is a personal webpage of a person who writes about technology as a hobby and the YMYL would be my work in the Defense industry. And the website content is a whole spectrum of subject matter and not a single subject. I do not buy links nor do a advertise on the web all my work is organic and spreads by word to mouth.

Reputation.

My reason to write this article is simply that I also do overclocking of pc hardware which can also be found on the website and SEO is like overclocking your website and I like to share this on my website. In order to establish this, an algorithm or reviewer will look at my social media platforms, steam profile and other content regarding the subject matter on this website. So if you want to establish a reputation link to your social media profiles, profiles like steam etc. This will reflect who you are a person, in the case of a business you will have separate profiles so you should link and backlink from those to your website. Try to find older examples of any of your activities or business activities mention and link to those. Share your links on social media like tweet out if you finish an article so people can find it that way. Put your work on Pinterest but ensure you do not have a small sample size of backlinks but a wide variety of relevant backlinks to your site. By relevant is that I get backlinks from overclocking sites to my articles and not from a car sale shop. A secondary source is my online gaming adventures there a logo's, screenshots of scores etc showing that I also spend a considerable amount of time working with hardware and using that hardware. The YMYL would be my work while most of this would not even be on the internet and is even classified it does have mentions in video's like a Peshmarga T-55 tank bouncing of an ATGM(Anti-Tank-Guided-Missile)of the front armor by angling its armor just before impact resulting in a non-lethal impact and the survival of the T-55 tank crew. Google algorithms and reviewers can find these all on YouTube another Google platform. So ensure if you have YMYL content Google can find this by having an online profile that reflects that. While most people will have a much easier time getting their YMYL by getting reviews I, unfortunately, can not due to the nature of my work.

Content Markup.

The end user experience is important and is made easier by providing content that has a good markup in terms of the coding and in terms of the markup of the actual text. The way your code is presented to Google is important do not clutter your website with crap. Here is a snapshot of my website by GTmetrix.com: https://gtmetrix.com/reports/www.hisevilness.com/NwgNb4Cs My PageSpeed score(Google) is 96% and 83% for Yslow(Yahoo). Run the GTmetrix tool on your own website and see where you can make improvements these will cover both the coding and the content. Just to highlight on major scoring aspect is the image size in size as well as dimension make sure you serve images that fit your page and that they are not resource intensive in terms of size(kb/mb). An easy way to optimize your images is by using https://tinypng.com/ and re-upload images that were too big in size to a smaller size also speeding up the user experience in the process.  Text markup it is important to remember not to spam caps or use H1 headers, use H1 header once to lead in the article then use H2 headers to lead in paragraphs and subparagraphs with H3 headers.

Content Delivery Network.

Make sure you can deliver your content around the globe from local servers without too much hassle and a CDN can be free or paid. I am used www.Cloudflare.com as my go to CDN. A CDN will also make is faster for Google to load and search your content. As mentioned above the scoring of GTmetrix thus Google shows minifying CSS/JavaScript/HTML a CDN service provider can do that for you with the click of a button. My SSL certificate is also from my CDN so my entire website is using the https:// protocol. As well as using basic GoDaddy hosting that is a shared solution the CDN has greatly increased loading speeds on PC and mobile devices.

Final thoughts. 

These are just some of the changes but by far the biggest and will have the most impact on how the web user will be able to find your content for the most part on Google. It is still wise to submit your website to Bing and Yandex so may be found by a wider audience. For a more in-depth analysis in the form of a webinar, I would refer to this YT video below as well as Google PDF distributed to the reviewers linked below. And for an in-depth SEO article, I previously have written surrounding the Joomla CMS found here: https://www.hisevilness.com/articles/technology/seo-tips-tricks-for-joomla-cms.html 

Google Manual User Review Guide PDF: https://www.hisevilness.com/images/PDF_Files/searchqualityevaluatorguidelines.pdf

- Paul "HisEvilness" Ripmeester.



Intel i7 OC'íng the 8086K on Z390 a Motherboard.

This guide will work for the i7 8700K as well as the i7 8086K the only difference is that the i7 8086K skew is binned at the expense of the i7 8700K skew, that said the i7 8700K should reach 5.0Ghz in most cases whereas the i7 8086K should be able to get between 5.1Ghz and 5.2Ghz or even 5.3Ghz if you have a golden chip. The settings here are an example to guide you to achieve your own overclock and will be different on a case by case basis, each component is different per build as well as the silicone lottery playing its part. Furthermore, this will be for the Z390 platform but it should also work for the Z370 platform with the main difference is wifi support for Z390 on the chipset as well as some minor BIOS tweaks.

My Rig:

  • CPU: i7 8086K limited edition.
  • Cooling: Corsair H150i Pro AIO.
  • Motherboard: ASUS Maximus Hero XI Z390.
  • G.Skill TridentZ RGB 32GB 3200Mhz, 4 x 8GB.
  • GPU: ASUS ROG Strix 1080ti.
  • PSU: Corsair RM850x with Cablemod Pro cables.
  • 6 x Corsair LL120 RGB fans, 3 x Corsair ML120 fans.
  • Storage: m.2 960 EVO, 1 x 500GB 860 EVO, 1 x 1TB 860 EVO, 2 X 2GB Seagate Barracuda.
  • Case: Lian Li PC-O11-Dynamic Tempered Glass.

This is first and foremost a gaming PC with high overclock in mind, optimized for gaming and showcase PC. AMD Ryzen is still a great value option and in my opinion and makes a better workstation, NAS Rig and Capture Rig. With more cores for less AMD Ryzen is a great entry into a work station and productivity and does not require a higher clock speed and overall benefits more from more cores. However, this does not go for all application that for instance benefit the Intel integrated graphics however if you stack core per core AMD offers much greater value. For that instance I made my main gaming build with Intel and AMD is the productivity build.

You can find my other guides relates to the above here:
Ryzen 5 OC'ing the 1600X.
Ryzen 5 OC'ing the 1600.
Streaming and/or recording using OBS NDI Tutorial.

Getting Started with overclocking the 8086k.

The usual checks, BIOS update, Windows update, driver updates and remove bird shit from the silicone(delid). For delidding and relidding, I used the Aqua-Computer Dr. Delid tool, the Der8auer Delid Die Mate 2 also works. If you do not want to delid you will run into higher temperatures and CPU throttling at lower voltages. The Z390 motherboards offer a more robust VRM over the Z370 motherboards but they also should work fine for the Intel i7 8086K and 8700K. In this case, I am using the Maximus Hero XI that has a nice Prediction display section on the left side it will give you a rough range of voltages and clock speeds for you to work with as well as a rating for your cooling solution, however, this is still guesswork on the ASUS motherboard side and is not featured on other brands like MSI and EVGA etc. Do take this with a grain of salt my initial overclock range was lower and I managed to get to 5.2Ghz stable and even boot into 5.3Ghz on my i7 8086K. Something else to consider is your clock with AVX loads, it will give a ballpark idea on what your voltage is for the overclock with AVX and without AVX loads.

ASUS Maximus Hero XI UEFI BIOS Prediction

BIOS Settings.

Time for some preparations and do some of the basic settings these are the Digi+ Power Control and Internal CPU Power Management settings. As usual, the settings naming convention might be different for other motherboard vendors like MSI but here an ASUS Maximus Hero XI was used. The most important part here will be the CPU Load-line Calibration you want to predict your Vdroop and ensuring you do not over or undershoot. In my case, I picked LLC 6 so I have a slight undershoot vs picking LLC 7 that would overshoot and generate a lot more heat. Again this will come down to the silicone lottery in each case and how much voltage you need for your overclock vs the Vdroop you have and the LLC you need to compensate for it.
For a more detailed rundown on LLC, VDroop and voltages for overclocking reference this article: https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/load-line_calibration.

Extreme Tweaker --> External Digi+ Power Control Settings.

  • CPU Load-line Calibration: to level 6 or 7, once achieving a stable overclock you could try to set Load Line Calibration 5 even.
  • CPU Current Capability: to 170% or the highest possible % on other motherboards.
  • CPU VRM Switching Frequency: set to Manual and set it to 500.
  • CPU Power Duty Control: set to Extreme.
  • CPU Power Phase Control: set to Extreme.
  • DRAM Current Capability and DRAM Switching Frequency settings are only needed when you want to overclock your RAM, for now, you leave that as is.

Boot Voltages is really only needed when you want to extreme overclock on LN2 etc. These settings do not apply for overclocking on Air or a Closed or Open Liquid Loop.

ASUS Maximus Hero XI External Digi+ Power Control

 Extreme Tweaker --> Internal CPU Power Management.

  • Intel(R) SpeedStep(tm) Disabled.
  • Long Duration Package Power: Limit set to the maximum for the Maximus Hero XI that is 4095.
  • Package Power Time Window: set to the maximum for the Maximus Hero XI that is 127.
  • Short Duration Package Power Limit: set to the maximum for the Maximus Hero XI that is 4095.

ASUS Maximus Hero XI Internal CPU Power Management

Advanced --> CPU Configurations --> CPU - Power Management Control.

  • Boot performance mod: I've set this to Turbo Performance however this can be left as the default setting.
  • Intel(R) SpeedStep(tm): Should be Disabled due to previous settings changes but double check.
  • CPU C-states: Set to Disabled.

ASUS Maximus Hero XI CPU Power Management Control

Overclock Settings: CPU Core Ratio, voltages, Ringbus, and misc voltages.

First, an important to note about the core voltages also known as Vcore, there are different save voltages for different cooling solutions and whether you delidded your CPU. As mentioned above having a delidded CPU with liquid metal and a closed or open loop will have greater overclocking potential. While the actual voltages will not kill the CPU the current could kill your CPU thermal protection and other safeguards are in place but it is better to play it save so adhere to the Vcore guidelines listed below. Ignoring these could lead to faster chip degradation and instabilities as well as thermal throttling.

  • Save Voltages for light overclocking, 1.2 Vcore @ 4.8Ghz for the 8700K, 1.2 Vcore @ 4.9Ghz for the 8086K.
    This is good and save starting point even if you have a good chip lower voltages will help to keep temperatures lower, start here if you are air cooling.
  • Save Voltages for medium overclocking, 1.3 Vcore @ 4.9Ghz, 1.3Vcore @ 5.1Ghz for the 8086K.
    Most data for the 8700K and 8086K stipulates that these are good starting voltages when using open or closed loop cooling
  • Above 1.4Vcore @ any frequency you will run into thermal throttling, any overclock on the 8700K or 8086K should be below 1.4Vcore to prevent thermal throttling and maintain save operating thermals.

Again it will vary what your CPU will run on voltages wise however the general rule is that lower voltages are better and you will overclock higher if your chip reaches higher frequency on lower voltages. Now let's dive into applying those overclock settings, there are some settings that vary between motherboard types and vendors you should be able to double check on the internet for your motherboard. However, the ASUS series should have the same naming conventions and lower end motherboard might have fewer settings you can change.

Extreme Tweaker.

Starting from the top, set your memory XMP under Ai Overclock Tuner to XMP you can tinker with your RAM settings once you have confirmed your CPU overclock is stable.BCLK Frequency will affect your entire overclock, so any changes here will change the CPU core frequency, Ringbus frequency, and RAM frequency leave this alone for now. ASUS MultiCore Enhancement is for stock settings it does not affect manual overclocks so it should be Disabled.SVID Behaviour I left at a Typical Scenario however it does not affect your overclock since you will manually override these settings.CPU SVID Support should be Disabled since you are manually entering settings.

ASUS Maximus Hero XI Extreme Tweaker Part I 

ASUS Maximus Hero XI Extreme Tweaker Part II

The above settings are important so your actual overclock will not be affected in any way shape or form now it is time to dial in the final settings and test the overclock. First, the important setting is the AVX Instruction Core Ration Negative Offset, AVX is in simple terms an instruction set for your CPU that gives it a heavy workload that requires more voltage thus generates more heat and is usually found in productivity and not in gaming or day to day tasks. Therefor motherboard vendors added the option to offset your CPU frequency for AVX loads so that you may achieve greater overclocks for none AVX loads like gaming. Some synthetic benchmarks like Prime95 will use AVX loads so be aware of that. Below are some suggestions for you to test out but I simply start with AVX frequency for the 8086k of 5.0Ghz and 4.8Ghz for the 8700K.

  • AVX offset for normal to bad chips should be 2 or 3.
  • AVX offset for golden chips can be 1 or 0.

ASUS Maximus Hero XI Extreme Tweaker AVX

Next up is setting the CPU Core Ratio this setting will determine your CPU frequency in Ghz, so a setting of 50 will result in a 5.0Ghz frequency. For the Maximus Hero X and XI you have the option to either set the frequency per core or Sync All Cores . To achieve the best performance it is best to use Sync All Cores so select that and fill in desired starting frequency under 1-Core Ratio Limit, for the 8086K we will start at 50 to get a 5.0Ghz frequency overclock. The 8700K it is best to start at 49 to achieve a 4.9Ghz frequency overclock. The BIOS will set the same frequency for all the other cores later on you can revisit this and see if you, for instance, can apply a higher overclock on cores 1 through 3 and lower the overclock on cores 4 to 6.

ASUS Maximus Hero XI Extreme Tweaker CPU Core Ratio

Next up is the Ringbus of your CPU, basically is the internal CPU communication speed, cache, IGP, memory controller etc. Performance gains here are very small none the less any gain of performance is wanted. But it is wise to start with the stock Ring Bus speed of 43 as in 4.3Ghz and revisit this setting once you confirmed a stable core overclock. A 1:1 overclock is considered the best but I run mine at 4.8Ghz unofficial the best overlock are within 0.5Ghz or less over the CPU frequency. Another important setting here is CPU Core/Cache Current Limit Max set this to the maximum, for the Maximus Hero XI that is a 255.75 setting. And leave the Ring Down Bin setting to Auto. Also, ensure the Min. CPU Cache Ratio and Max. CPU Cache Ratio remains the same.

ASUS Maximus Hero XI Extreme Tweaker RingBus

The final step is setting the Vcore or CPU Core/Cache Voltage, this setting will apply to the CPU and the Ringbus in order to maintain a stable overclock. And you will revisit this section multiple times when your overclock passes or fails. For now, you can set the CPU Core/Cache Voltage to Manual Mode other modes are more finicky and manual mode while being less power efficient does offer greater overclock stability. Under - CPU Core Voltage Override fill in 1.3 this will apply a 1.3 voltage to your CPU for the 8086K this should be more than enough to reach 5.0Ghz and the 8700K should be able to reach 4.9Ghz. The CPU VCCIO Voltage and CPU System Agent Voltage should be initially left to Auto but should be changed later on to lower voltages and decrease thermal output but only once you established a stable overlock. You can opt to save your settings under Tool or proceed with hitting F10 to save your settings and reboot your PC. The first boot might power up and down this is your PC testing out your overclock settings but should boot into windows. If your PC fails to boot the overlock failed and you should either lower the voltage of the CPU Vore/Cache Voltage or lower the CPU frequency CPU Core Ratio.

ASUS Maximus Hero XI Extreme Tweaker Vcore

Now that you have booted into windows you should do some stability testing to ensure your overclock is stable I usually start out with Cinebench and do 3 runs to give me a good indication as well as ensuring the overlock does not generate more than 90C of heat preferable lower than that. If your initial Cinebench runs pass you can head back into the BIOS by holding Shift then click restart from the windows menu, then select Advanced Troubleshooting Tools, Advanced Options and select UEFI Firmware Settings or simply restart and keep pressing Del or F2 when booting up. Depending on a pass or fail you either lower or increase the CPU Core Ratio and boot back into windows and run Cinebench again to see if you fail or pass. Failing again you will need to lower the CPU Core Ratio until you are stable at the same CPU Core/Chache Voltage.

If you pass you should increase the CPU Core Ratio until the Cinebench runs fail and then increase the Vcore but not above 1.4 volt. Once you have established the max possible overlock you should do a final stability test using Prime95 using the Small FFT's setting and run that for at least 30 minutes without crashing or the program reporting errors. Very important as well is ensure with the final test to check your temperatures with a program like HWiNFO64 and make sure you do not go beyond 90C or thermal throttle altogether. When doing so make sure you either have a fan curve that will run at 100% with temperatures above 75C or set your fans manually to run at max RPM.

Once you completed those test you can consider your overclock stable you can now opt to adjust the Ringbus speed and lower the CPU VCCIO Voltage and the CPU System Agent Voltage and repeat the stability testing with starting with Cinebench runs then confirming stability with Prime95 while keeping an eye on temperatures in HWiNFO64. And remember to give the Load Line Calibration a shot at setting 5.

8086k Vcore Curve.

For the purpose of helping out some other overclockers, I went back into the Bios and did some testing with various clock speeds. Here are my results yours may vary due to the silicone lottery.

8086k @ 5.0Ghz

  • 50 Core Ration.
  • Vcore @ 1.230
  • AVX -1
  • LLC 6
  • Ringbus @ 47
  • Validation with P95 Small FFT's and Custom 8K FFT's.

8086K @ 5.1Ghz.

  • 51 Core Ration.
  • Vcore @ 1.295
  • AVX -1
  • LLC 6
  • Ringbus @ 47
  • Validation with P95 Small FFT's and Custom 8K FFT's.

8086K @ 5.2Ghz.

  • 52 Core Ration.
  • Vcore @ 1.380
  • AVX -1
  • LLC 6
  • Ringbus @ 47
  • Validation with P95 Small FFT's and Custom 8K FFT's.

8086K @ 5.3Ghz.

  • 53 Core Ration.
  • Vcore @ 1.425
  • AVX -2
  • LLC 7
  • Ringbus @ 47
  • Validation with P95 Custom 8K FFT's Only.

Now you should have a firm grasp on how to overclock an 8086k or 8700K on a Z390 motherboard. The numbers used in the pictures are for my end use case and might vary with you. Cinebench runs scores should be around the 1700 mark. Slight instabilities can also be spotted when Cinebench hangs for a second or more. Increasing the CPU Core/Cache Ration by 0.005 can even fix that. Remember to share my guide if you find it useful.

- Paul "HisEvilness" Ripmeester.


OBS and NDI streaming and recording tutorial.

This will be a quick run down to record and stream without the need of a capture card. Streaming directly from your gaming rig without a capture card will result in performance loss in a game. While initially, I was looking to buy a capture card the end result was disappointing. My main monitor is a 1440p 165hz refresh rate and the capture card locks the refresh rate to 60hz and the Duplicate Desktop option also generates problems on its own. And you still have to run software from your main pc besides this requires resources it also means capturing in-game means you can not alt-tab as it will cut the feed and displays your captured desktop. However, I went back to the web trying to find some way I can capture footage and have more freedom doing so. Here is where I stumbled upon NDI for OBS it removes all restrictions I have with a capture card and allows for much better fine-tuning of your whatever you want to capture.

Pros:

  • No capture card needed.
  • No performance impact on your main/gaming rig.
  • Recording and streaming in high quality at the same time.
  • Capture any resolution size and increase or decrease resolution size.
  • No refresh rate cap on the main/gaming rig.

Cons:

  • Requires a 2nd PC.
  • Takes up LAN bandwidth.

Getting Started with OBS and NDI.

You will need a 2nd PC, this can be any PC or laptop the better, of course, will result in better footage as well as being able to stream and record at the same time if you are a content creator as well. You can start out with a very cheap 2nd hand pc with cheap mice and keyboard as well as a screen. you can use 1 screen but this would mean you will have to change feeds what is suboptimal and you would have to set everything up before starting a stream and or recording. however, you would only need an iGPU or basic GPU since you will not use that hardware to capture any feed from your gaming rig. In terms of RAM, you will need 8GB however you will be needing a strong CPU since all encoding is done with the CPU. In short, the more cores and the higher the frequency the better, starting with a Ryzen CPU or older gen Intel CPU would yield the best results. 

For future reference, I will list my NAS/Capture rig specs, nothing special about it I am using parts from my older gaming rig I recently upgraded.

  • CPU: Ryzen 5 1600X overclocked to 3.9Ghz.
  • RAM: DDR4 Corsair 16GB 3200Mhz.
  • GPU: ASUS RX 570 4GB(no iGPU on Ryzen).
  • Mobo: ASUS X370 Gaming-F.
  • Storage: M.2 C Drive, SSD Gaming drive, Striped RAID Array.

The Raid array is for storing the footage, you do not need any M.2 or SSD for a Capture rig I just had these drives on hand. Another important note for those who overlock either of their rigs ensures your fan curve is set to create a minimal amount of noise. Having a beefy CPU cooler with a higher TDP will help greatly reducing noise while maintaining cooler CPU load temperatures. I am a fan of the Gelid Phantom Black overkill for a NAS/Capture rig but it barely makes any noise so a perfect solution for a modest price(35 Euro). While running a Corsair 150i Pro 360 radiator with push/pull on my 8086k @ 5.2Ghz, delidded and liquid metal applied and resealed. 

Besides the obvious OBS installation on both PC's or Laptops, you will need the NDI plugin the installation file can be found here: OBS NDI You will need to install this on both systems and reboot. Your gaming rig will transfer the captured feed over your LAN or Wifi so ensure those can handle the increased traffic. I am recommending you are at least on a 1GB LAN using Cat5e cables, a 10GB network is better but a lot more expensive. Wifi is not stable enough in most cases I would recommend against using that but it can work at the cost of performance of the captured feed by saturation of the wifi signal. Using a 100MB/s network is possible I have seen my traffic go up to 25mb/s with just the capture feed, it will restrict your internet performance. Important to remember here is that you will send from your gaming rig to your capture rig a feed over LAN of x amount of MB/s and that both rigs will also communicate with the internet taking up x amount of MB/s for streaming and gaming.
But in most cases routers have 1GB switches so unless your network is really old I would not be worried but it is certainly wise to check your router specs and double check the network cables you use an upgrade if needed.

OBS: https://obsproject.com/
Streamlabs: https://streamlabs.com/
OBS NDI: https://obsproject.com/forum/resources/obs-ndi-newtek-ndi%E2%84%A2-integration-into-obs-studio.528/

Setting up your NDI Feed.

You will capture from your gaming rig, voice chat will happen from the Gaming Rig so you will need to setup OBS or Streamlabs to your taste. All OBS or Streamlabs will do it generate a feed and send it to through your LAN to your Capture Rig. Besides your own preferred setup, you will need to set up the NDI plugin. Any extra you might have like overlays, widgets, and alerts can be done from either rig, but I would suggest using the Capture rig so you never have to alt-tab and use the mice/keyboard or even streaming deck(s) from your capture rig. Allows you to work on your stream without the viewer ever knowing as well as any smooth recording session as a result.
In OBS go to Tools then select NDI Output Settings, tick both boxes on Main Output and Preview Output and give them a name.
OBS NDI Plugin Location
You will notice that while the NDI plugin is active you can not modify the output settings so ensure you have those set or go back to the NDI plugin and untick the boxed to modify your output settings. I will have some more tips for the quality of your capture feed below but first, let's finish the basics. The next step will be capturing the feed using NDI plugin on your Capture Rig, In your preferred scene to stream or capture add a source and select NDI Source, Select Create new and name this source to your liking and click OK.
OBS NDI Plugin Scene Source
You will be presented with a options screen, Under Source name select the feed that you named in OBS/Streamlabs NDI plugin setup. Ensure you use the highest possible bandwidth for the best results unless you intend to use lower settings. Also, make sure the YUV Range is set to Full and the YUV Color Space is set to BT.709. And then click OK. You will notice as soon as you select a feed it will start displaying your desktop this means it is now receiving and you are ready to start Streaming and or Recording.
OBS NDI Plugin NDI Source
Now you will have to select your stream service and enter your stream key and select a Recording Path if you wish to record as well. Furthermore, you will have the option to record as you stream or just make a recording for you to make content. Always use the X264 encoder over hardware, the CPU encoding is more powerful and yields better quality results. Important here as well as to ensure you select the right bitrate with the right resolution for your recording or stream. In my case using my hardware I Record and Stream 1080p @ 60 FPS with a streaming bitrate of 6000 and a recording bitrate of 12000.
These setting will vary with hardware as well as any limits a streaming service might impose on your feed, but recording wise you can do whatever you want just make sure there is no lag and you have a stable stream that does not drop frames giving the best viewing experience.

Recording Only.

If you just wish to capture video material for let's say YouTube content without much hassle simply go to Output under Settings on the Capture rig. Then select the Output Mode and set this to Simple. Ensure your recording path is correct and select Indisnguisable Quality, Large File Size. Recording format set to flv if you lose power you can still use the captured material over mp4 etc, you can convert the flv to mp4 if your editing software needs it later on. Also, make sure the Encode is set to Software (x264). But remember this will be large files so you will need plenty of disk space and if you want to make backups you will need a beefy NAS solution locally or in a cloud storage solution. To start recording simply click Start Recording on your Capture rig en ensure you do not have any overlays active to capture clean material.

Tips & Tricks.

As you may notice the OBS/Streamlabs resolution for streaming and recording is set to the screen size, you can temporarily set your screen resolution to 1440p or 4k and adjust the settings in OBS/Streamlabs. Then you can save these settings without OBS/Streamlabs reverting those back when you set your resolution back to the original resolution of the screen. Remember to adjust your bitrate accordingly and test your stream and recording for a CPU bottleneck. Another way to increase your stream and recording quality is by increasing the CPU Usage Preset from Very Fast to Faster or higher. You can on your main rig select under Tune the Film setting to increase quality at the expense of LAN bandwidth.

Bitrate options for streaming.

  • 1080p @ 60 fps: 4500 to 6000.
  • 1080p @ 30 fps: 3500 to 5000.
  • 720p @ 60 fps: 3500 to 5000.
  • 720p @ 30 fps: 2500 to 4000.

This covers the basics of setting up your OBS/Streamlabs streaming and or recording Capture Rig there are many more options but this should get you started on a high-quality stream and or recording spree.
Please share or link the article if you find it useful.

- "Note to self: shoot anyone near the console on outpost Kareah"


Samsung A3/A5/A7 2017 Root & Oreo OS upgrade Tutorial.

Found a great way of turning my Samsung A5 2017 into an A8 2018 in terms of the OS through a ported OS, as well as having root access. I found current guides somewhat confusing so I decided to write my own guide to root and install the OS. But before we start this can brick your device so make sure you make back up of all your files, contact list and data on a micro SD card and then back up those to your PC for redundancy. Again do this at your own peril however in a worst-case scenario you have to install a stock ROM and start over, something I will cover in the last part of this guide. Also, an important note bank apps tend to NOT like rooted phones, for this reason, I would advise against rooting and installing a custom OS or simply get a 2nd phone just for banking apps I am using a Samsung A3 2017 for banking apps that I left untouched and unrooted. This tutorial also works for the Samsung A3 2017 and the Samsung A7 2017 version but in this case, I am using a Samsung A5 2017 to write this tutorial.

Preparations:

The hardware side and enabling developer mode.

  • A Samsung A3/A5/A7 2017 Phone.
  • Micro SD Card of a capacity of 3GB or more.
  • Developer Mode Enabled(How to below).
  • Samsung USB Cable & any PC or Laptop.

The enable developer mode procedure:

  • Go to Settings.
  • Scroll down to "About Phone".
  • Software Information.
  • Look for the infobox "Build number".
  • Tap this 7 times, after 3 times you will get a notification "you are x tabs away etc"
  • Head back to "Settings".
  • Scroll Down.
  • Select "Developer options".
  • Enable: "OEM unlock".
  • Enable: "USB debugging".

And you are done preparing to root and install a new OS to your Samsung A3/A5/A7 2017 phone. The next steps will be downloading the right software versions and utilities to root and install the Android Orea 8.0 OS. Below I will list and link all the files you need including a link to a zip file stored on my site to download all the files but for those security nuts out there I will provide a link per download so you can verify the content of each individual zip file.

Download the following files:

Now extract the Odin3 zip file on your desktop or desired folder and place the TWRP zip file in there as well, place the RMM-State Bypass Mesa v2, Magisk v18.x and HadesRom Oreo Stock v6.0 on your micro-SD card.

  • Power off your phone.
  • Hold the following buttons: Home button + Power button + Volume DOWN button, this will load you into a green screen with "downloading".
  • Start Odin3.
  • untick the Auto Reboot.
  • Under AP select the TWRP zip file you placed in your Odin3 folder.
  • Click Start.
  • Wait for the Odin3 program to say Pass, big green box that says Pass right below the Odin3 program header.
  • Hold the following buttons: Power button + Volume DOWN button to power down your device.
  • Hold the following buttons: Power button + Volume UP + Home button and release on the Samsung screen to enter TWRP.
  • Swipe to unlock or simply select Wipe.
  • Tap: "Advanced Wipe" and select: Dalvik Cache, Cache, Data, System.
  • Select wipe again and tap the: Format Data(this step is only needed when coming from the stock ROM"
  • Tap the "Select Storage" button and select your micro-SD card.
  • Select the RMM-State_Bypass_Mesa_v2.zip.
  • Now swipe the "Swipe to confirm Flash"
  • Select and tap Reboot and select "Recovery".

Next step in TWRP is to root your device using Magisk v18.x or newer. And allows for root access on your phone.

  • Since you rebooted into TWRP in the last portion of this guide select Install.
  • Select the Magisk zip file.
  • Swipe the "Swipe to confirm Flash"
  • Select Reboot and select Recover.

So now your device is rooted it is time to install the custom Hades ROM you can also opt to just keep your device as is and not continue with the next step of installing a custom ROM.

  • Last step you booted back into TWRP.
  • Select Install.
  • Tap "Select Storage" and select your micro-SD card.
  • Select the "hadesRom_Oreo_Stock_v6.0"
  • And now swipe the"Swipe to confirm Flash"
  • This will install the custom ROM.
  • Now select Reboot and tap "System"

This should now boot into your new Oreo 8.0 OS and will prompt you to do the setup as usual. If you followed this guide to the letter anyway below I will go over the steps when you hard or soft brick your device. When you do or corrupt any files by unplugging or stopping any flashing in the above-mentioned steps you will need to install the stock ROM and start all over. The main reason why everyone says make backups, while I never had any problems this is just a cover all the basics guide.

First of all, you will need to find a stock ROM of your phone, may it be the Samsung A3/A5/A7 2017 from the correct country and provider. Sites might require you to register and the download speeds might be somewhat slow of premium membership.

After obtaining the correct or generic stock ROM you will need to unzip the files in a folder on your hard drive can van easily find them. Next step is to open Odin3 and connect your phone via the USB cable. If your phone does not even shut down or does not respond simply let the battery drain.

  • Power off your phone.
  • Hold the following buttons: Home button + Power button + Volume DOWN button, this will load you into a green screen with "downloading".
  • Select the BL file, files you unzipped starting with BL_ in Odin3.
  • Select the AP file, files you unzipped starting with AP_ in Odin3.
  • Select the C P file, files you unzipped starting with CP_ Odin3.
  • Select the CDC file, files you unzipped starting with CSC_ Odin3.
  • Ensure that only F.Reset Time and Auto Reboot are ticked.
  • Select Start.
  • Wait for the big green box with Pass it will then reboot into your stock OS.

This will recover any damage, unroot/unbrick and unfck your Samsung Phone. And you can opt to redo the steps above or call it a day. In any case, I hope you enjoy this tutorial and the endlless possibilties a unrooted phones give you.

 


Opinions, opinions and then some more opinions when it comes to desktop builds with AMD and Intel CPU's.
Stepping away from the fray I would like to throw my 2 cents into the conversation as an end user who pays for his hardware.
Writing this article is based on end-user experience from a person who was listed as the worlds most dangerous hacker using a Pentium II.
To an advent gamer who racks up legendary scores in PvP games in over 2 decades of gaming, photoshop editing, and web design.
At the end of the day, it is to you the reader and therefore end-user how to spend and what to spend your money on.
This article is for the purpose of offering perspective backed up by experience from different angle stepping away from the fray.

Value.

Value is made up in 2 parts, the first is what a corporation would like to charge you for their product.
This is effected by the bottom line, how much it costs to produce their product(s), their R&D expenses, PR and staffing costs.
Part 2 is you the end-user, you decide how much value you want to attach to a product, the corporate PR tries to influence you.
It is called Public Relations for a reason they are being paid to represent their product as best they can and might even lie.
Always wise to cross-reference with multiple sources, people who are for and against but try to filter out the "fanboy" information.
But at the end of the day you the end-user decides where to spend and how much you are willing to spend on a given product.

CPU Bottleneck, performance, and basics.

A bottleneck in your hardware is either the CPU or the GPU when it comes to gaming.
In order to find what is your bottleneck run some benchmarks ingame and see what is maxing out first.
Some games are more CPU intensive and some more GPU intensive, run different games to get an accurate picture.
Then there is your screen, 1080p, 1440p and 4K those will also bottleneck different components.
1080p will always bottleneck the CPU and 4K will always bottleneck the GPU.
Then there is a refresh rate, a 165hz screen is capable of displaying 165 FPS with the standard being 60hz on most screen.
This ties into your screen resolution so when your CPU or GPU is getting bottlenecked at different resolutions.
Other components such as the amount of RAM and what speeds and timings your RAM runs.
Your storage solution also influences this, games on an SSD will have better loading times, lower latency over a regular hard drive.

Intel.

Known for higher prices but the best clock speeds on their CPU's, the Intel premium as it is lovingly referred to.
Intel has an overall dominance over the desktop, laptop and server market over AMD and you will see more Intel systems.
Their performance for high-end gaming/overclocking is somewhat hampered by using really bad paste between the chip and IHS.
And not all Intel CPU's can be overclocked you will need a K variant such as an 8086K and a motherboard that has an overclocking chipset.

AMD.

Mostly known for the value and not charging a premium for their product AMD is not known by many in the general public.
They have a far smaller market share then Intel but are making a come back with their Ryzen and Thread Ripper CPU's.
All AMD chips are soldered so their thermal performance is much better may it be at lower clock speeds.
The only motherboards from AMD that do not support overclocking are their low-end motherboard chipsets.

Building AMD.

Most commonly referred to as the budget option AMD systems tend to cost less may it be at a small performance hit in gaming.
With workstations and servers, they are however making waves with the Thread Ripper being on par with Intel in terms of performance.
I am using a Ryzen 1600X that I used for gaming and now I am turning it into a NAS/Capture rig with NAS storage drives.
It has lower operating voltage thus consumes less power and the motherboard chipset offers more PCIe lanes over Intel.
This means you can run an m.2 C drive and 6 SATA drives with a GPU and a capture card without add-in cards.
As mentioned above the CPU is bottlenecked at 1080p there for it is wise to use a 1440p screen with free-sync and an AMD GPU.
The bottlenecked is now your GPU with free-sync on an AMD GPU smoothing out the frames per second.
AMD GPU's are in general less expensive then NVIDIA and the Free-Sync monitors also charge no premium.
Most people on a budget go for 1080p but that would as mentioned above bottleneck the CPU resulting in a lower FPS.
In short, if you want high fps with high refresh rate Free Sync monitor but you are on a budget go AMD.

Building Intel.

If you want the highest possible FPS at the highest possible refresh rate you will end up with an Intel CPU and Nvidia GPU.
But this will come at the premium even more so in recent days of writing this article currently prices are inflated so you pay even more.
As well as building a workstation, you also will pay this premium more performance at an exponential cost.
Intel has the i5/i7/i9 as a mainstream CPU's and the Xeon and X series CPU's for workstations and servers.
The main difference between mainstream vs professional in the number of PCIe lanes and RAM channel you have.
Gaming on a highly competitive level is still best with Intel you will get the best FPS at the highest possible refresh rate.
That said your GPU will be the bottleneck on 4k but most high-end gamers or streamers do not play on 4k due to the lack of FPS.
4k Gaming is becoming somewhat viable with the new 2080ti and the release of 4k high refresh rate monitors.
But it will be at least 1 more generation of GPU architecture before 4k gaming on the highest level will be viable.
And due to the fact the mainstream CPU's offer fewer PCIe lanes, you will not be able to connect as many devices to your motherboard.
That said most gaming PC's use external storage, for the most part, may it be somewhat forced upon by Intel.
Also to consider here is when using NVIDIA you cannot use Free-Sync you will be relegated to G-Sync that also comes with a premium.
You can opt-in to use an AMD GPU and go for Free-Sync but at the current time, there aren't any real high-end AMD GPU's.
For my end user experience, I wanted the highest possible performance on my 1440p, 165hz Acer Predator monitor.
Running on an overclocked 8086k/Z390 Motherboard, ASUS ROG 1080ti, 32GB of G.Skill DDR4 with Samsung 860 EVO SSD's.

Conclusion.

Intel and AMD are pretty much tied in the server and workstation market with AMD offering much sharper pricing for their products.
For gaming, Intel is still king if you want the absolute max in frames per second paired with a Nvidia GPU.
AMD is a great budget option, from low end to mid range builds that will game just fine at considerable less cost.
it comes down to you the end-user where you want to spend your money and how much you wish to spend.
But the market does need competition or prices will be inflated and performance gains will be far less.
Therefore I step away from the fray and I buy AMD/Intel and Nvidia products when they are priced right for the right amount of performance.

-Booommmm! Headshot!
Paul "HisEvilness" Ripmeester.


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Intel vs AMD, the CPU war.

Opinions, opinions and then some more opinions when it comes to desktop builds with AMD and Intel CPU's.Stepping away from the fray I would like
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